Hope...
Gives us a chance.
“That's the thing about pain...it demands to be felt.” ― John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

"It's not impossible, just imaginary"
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barefootbeautyqueen:

voxamberlynn:

lexbots:

the pumpkin king / sally

Okay, but holy shit, THIS IS UNREAL.

Make up looks done by MadeYewLook

4 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 |72,401 notes

gayisthenewokay:

if i was bisexual i would use this line all the time

4 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 |25,682 notes

I just victim-blamed my roommate for getting eaten by a dragon.

"Maybe if you didn’t want to get eaten, you should have been wearing heavier armor."

4 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 |3 notes

asylum-art:

10 Magical Pebble Paths That Flow Like Rivers

The garden or back-yard is one of the best places in a home for the home-owner to express their creative side. Why surround all those beautiful plants with an ugly path when you can create a creative stone garden path that looks like a work of art? We collected this list to show you what a well-done pebble garden path can look like.

River stones and pebbles worked really well for the projects in these pictures, but just about any stone can work as long as you can think of a cool design with it and turn it into a stable path.

  1. Judy White
  2. unknown
  3.  Claire Ashman
  4. Francesca Gallo
  5.  sarako
  6. pebbleandcomosaics.com
  7. Sarah Garner
  8. lorifeger.hubpages.com
  9. Chuck Domitrovich
  10. Jeffrey Bale

Plans for my future home.

4 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 |3,919 notes

mskamalakhan:

sallysbutter:

birth control pills: 

  • can treat cysts, endometriosis, pcos, and other potentially life-threatening conditions
  • can lessen severe symptoms of menstruation
  • can treat hormonal imbalances that result in severe acne and other side effects
  • can prevent pregnancy from ever occurring

erectile dysfunction drugs:

  • give you an erection

4 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 |112,439 notes
5 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 |68,913 notes
sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

image

5 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 |166,656 notes
thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.

This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

6 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 |41,521 notes
Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College
6 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 |101,772 notes

zethie:

rougeoctobre:

i don’t care if it’s a only a joke, please don’t make comments about how someone’s choice of field of study isn’t going to take them anywhere because it can be a great source of stress and your joke won’t help.

also, destroy the idea that we should only pursue dreams if they are likely to give you status in this capitalist piece-of-shit society.

6 hours ago on September 1st, 2014 |142,039 notes